J262 : 34th National Encampment GAR Badge 1900 $675.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Delegate to 34th National Encampment, Chicago, IL . There were 1250 delegates to the National encampment in 1900. This is a four part badge suspension ribbon. There is a small black spot on the left wing of the eagle.
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J263 : 41st National Encampment GAR Badge 1907 $500.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to 41st National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic(GAR), 1907, Saratoga Springs, NY. 1517 delegates were issued this three part bronze badge with a red, white and blue ribbon over a gold ribbon.
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J264 : 46th National Encampment GAR Badge 1912 $250.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 46th National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Badge 1912. L.A. Calif. 649 delegates attended and were issued 4 piece badge with gold backing ribbon. Small black on the bottom medal, does not cover any part of the bust. The eagle is marked on back J.K. Davison's Sons, Phila.
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J265 : 47th National Encampment GAR Badge 1912 $350.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 47th National Encampment Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) badge, Chatanooga Tenn September 15-20, 1913. This 4 piece medal on a gold backing ribbon was issued to the 977 delegates in attendence. Two pieces are marked, The Whitehead & Hoag Co. Newark, NJ.
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J266 : 47th National Encampment GAR Badge 1912 $350.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 47th National Encampment Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) badge, Chatanooga Tenn September 15-20, 1913. This 4 piece medal on a gold backing ribbon was issued to the 977 delegates in attendence. Two pieces are marked, The Whitehead & Hoag Co. Newark, NJ, the eagle is marked H.C. Lilley & Co. Columbus, Ohio.
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J267 : 54th National Encampment GAR Badge 1920 $250.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 54th National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Badge Sept 19-25, 1920 Indianapolis, Indiana. A four part badge of bronze and white metal with gold backing ribbon, issued to one of the 1260 delegates. Two of the hangers are marked The Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, NJ.
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J268 : 62nd National Encampment GAR Badge 1928 $200.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 62nd National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge September 16- 21, 1928 Denver, Colo. This badge, a three piece bronze with two backing ribbons, the first is gold the second being red, white and blue was issued to each of the 1306 delegates that attended. Maker marks on two of the pieces, "The Whitehead & Hoag Co. Newark, NJ".
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J269 : 63rd National Encampment GAR Badge 1928 $250.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 63rd National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge September 8 -13, 1929 Portland, Maine. The 1929 badge is a bronze and white medal badge with two backing ribbons, one gold and the other being red, white and blue and was issued to the 1221 delegates in attendence. The ribbon is torn completely across(just above Representative hanger). Maker markes on three of the hangers "Bastian Bros. Co. Rochester, N.Y.".
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J270 : 64th National Encampment GAR Badge 1928 $225.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 64th National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge ugust 24 -29, 1930. There were 1076 delegates in attendence each receiving this 3 piece badge. The badge is bronze and white medal with a gold backing ribbon. The ribbon has 3 very small holes, 1 at the upper right by the chain and two between the hanger pieces. Maker mark is "The Whitehead & Hoag Co, Newark, NJ".
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J271 : 68th National Encampment GAR Badge 1934 $225.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 68th National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge August, 1934 Rochester, NY. This 4 piece badge made of bronze and white medal, with gold backing ribbon was awarded to the 771 delegates attending the National Encampment. This badge has the maker mark of "Metal Arts co. roch, NY".
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J272 : 63rd National Encampment GAR Badge 1928 $225.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 63rd National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge September 5 -10, 1937 in Madison Wisconsin. Each of the 488 delegates received one of these four piece bornze badges with a gold backing ribbon.
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J273 : 83rd National Encampment GAR Badge 1949 Final $500.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 83rd National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR)Badge August 28, 1949 Final Encampment, Indianapolis, Indiana. This is a 3 piece medal made of bronze and has a gold backing ribbon. Very hard badge to find, this one in mint condition. These were given to the 16 delegates that attending the final encampment of the GAR.
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J274 : 42nd National Encampment GAR Badge 1908 $425.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Representative to the 42nd National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), Toledo, Ohio 1908. There were 1517 delegates in 1908 that were issued this 4 part badge with a gold backing ribbon.
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J288 : Id'd GAR Canteen $680.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Other
GAR white porcelin canteen with painted GAR membership badge M.H. Amphlett, 17th Mich. VI
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J293a : Very Early Dated M1840 Ames Cavalry Saber Ames Manufacturing Company $1,050.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Weapons, Edged, Swords
This 1847 dated edged weapon is a wonderful representative specimen of the heavy combat saber issued to Federal dragoons during the Mexican War and later to Union horsesoldiers engaged in the War of Rebellion. Manufactured by the acclaimed Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, this saber was one of 2,220 such sabers delivered to the Ordnance Department under the Ames contract of 1847. Well liked by both the cavalrymen and the dragoons, the men often referred to it the "Old Wrist Breaker". The only complaint leveled against the M1840 was its excessive weight of 4 pounds, 8 oz when it rested in its scabbard. The 35 7/8" long, curved, unsharpened blade bears almost all of its original, shiny bright finish. Weapon is 1 5/16" wide and has a back thickness of 7/16". Among the features on these M1840 sabers are the squared back profile, grips that are narrow at the pommel and widen toward the hilt, and its hatchet point tip. As author and sword expert John Thillmann notes in his descriptive new book, "These sabers hold a great deal of collector appeal due to their fine lines and length of active service". Specimen exhibits a gray appearance with scattered staining. Marked on the reverse ricasso is "US / R.C." (Rufus Chandler, U.S.N.). The obverse ricasso has "N.P. AMES / CABOTVILLE / 1847". All stampings are clear and strong. The tight, brass hilt retains the original buff leather washer. Grip is in excellent condition with the original black bridle leather strong and dry but with no cracks or breaks. Excellent twisted brass wire wrap is tight and consists of 20-gauge wire with 15 twists per inch and 18 turns around the grip. Brass hilt, with its two-branch guard and knucklebow, is tight and strong. The well-worn, steel scabbard wears a dull, brown patina. Upper ring mount shows heavy, telltale wear from this weapon being belted and worn much by a trooper during the war. Drag shows angled wear to its edge. The two sword ring bands are tight and secure two 1¼" diameter sword rings. This fine, Civil War, Ames saber is a worthy specimen to any edged weapon display or collection.
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  J293b : M1850 Foot Officer's Sword $1,100.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Weapons, Edged, Swords
Model 1850 Foot Officer's Sword. 37 3/4" overall w/ 31" blade. Blade etched throughout first 60% of blade including, crossed cannons, eagle & shield, & "US". Brass hilt. Sharkskin grip. Seam of sharkskin starting to separate. Grips shows spots of wear. Brass boundsharkskin scabbard is solid throughout. CONDITION: blade is fair w/ severe pitting around bottom 15% of blade.
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J300 : Confederate Gen. James Longstreet CDV $300.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Confederate
James Longstreet (South Carolina), CSA Lt. Gen., nice wartime CDV of Longstreet in his CSA uniform with a vintage hand written "Gen Longstreet C.S.A." across the bottom of the CDV. Backmarked by Anthony. Good
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J302 : Union Gen. Hugh Judson kilpatrick CDV $275.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Federal
Brigadier General Hugh Judson "Kil-Cavalry" Kilpatrick. Very nice full length CDV of the General in an unusual pose. Very Good tonear fine. Brady, New York backmark.
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J303 : Union Major Gen. Philip Kearny CDV $150.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Federal
Major General Philip Kearny, nice profile bust view cdv, with J.W. Everett & Co. backmark cut and pasted on.. Very good condition. Kearny, who pronounced his name /'k?rni?/, was born in New York City to a wealthy family. His father and mother were Philip Kearny, Sr., and Susan Watts. His maternal grandfather John Watts, the last Royal Recorder of New York City, was one of New York's wealthiest residents, who had vast holdings in ships, mills, factories, banks, and investment houses. Kearny's father was a Harvard-educated New York City financier who owned his own brokerage firm and was also a founder of the New York Stock Exchange. Early in life, Kearny desired a career in the military. His parents died when he was young, and he was consequently raised by his grandfather, who insisted against the younger Kearny's wishes that he pursue a law career. Kearny attended Columbia College, attaining a law degree in 1833. His cousin John Watts de Peyster, who had also attended Columbia, wrote the first authoritative biography on Kearny. In 1836, his grandfather died, leaving Kearny a fortune of over $1 million. Instead of a life of ease and luxury, he chose to make the army his profession. The following year Kearny obtained a commission as a second lieutenant of cavalry, assigned to the 1st U.S. Dragoons, who were commanded by his uncle, Colonel Stephen W. Kearny, and whose adjutant general was Jefferson Davis. The regiment was assigned to the western frontier. Kearny was sent to France, in 1839, to study cavalry tactics, first attending school at the famous cavalry school in Saumur, France, and then participating in several combat engagements with the Chasseurs d'Afrique in Algiers. Kearny rode into battle with a sword in his right hand, pistol in his left, and the reins in his teeth, as was the style of the Chasseurs. His fearless character in battle earned him the nickname by his French comrades "Kearny le Magnifique" or "Kearny the Magnificent." He returned to the United States in the fall of 1840 and prepared a cavalry manual for the Army based on his experiences overseas. Shortly afterward, he was designated aide-de-camp to General Alexander Macomb, and continued to serve in this position until Macomb's death in June 1841. After a few months at the cavalry barracks in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Kearny was assigned to the staff of General Winfield Scott, soon becoming his aide-de-camp. He did additional duty on the frontier, accompanying his uncle's unit on an expedition to the South Pass of the Oregon Trail in 1845. Kearny, disappointed with the lack of fighting he was seeing in the Army, resigned his commission in 1846, but returned to duty only a month later at of the outbreak of the Mexican-American War. Kearny was assigned to raise a troop of cavalry for the 1st U.S. Dragoons, Company F, in Terre Haute, Indiana. He spared no expense in recruiting his men and acquiring 120 matched dapple gray horses with his own money. This unit was originally stationed at the Rio Grande but soon became the personal bodyguard for General Scott, the commander in chief of the Army in Mexico. Kearny was promoted to captain in December 1846. Kearny and his men participated in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco; in the latter engagement Kearny led a daring cavalry charge and suffered a grapeshot wound to his left arm, which later had to be amputated. Kearny's courage earned him the respect of his soldiers and fellow officers alike, the greatest of which came from General-in-Chief Winfield Scott, who called him "a perfect soldier" and "the bravest man I ever knew". Kearny nevertheless quickly returned to duty, and when the U.S. Army entered Mexico City the following month, he had the personal distinction of being the first man through the gates of the city. After the war, Kearny did a stint with the Army recruiting service in New York City. While there, he was presented with a sword by the Union Club for his service during the war, and was promoted to major. In 1851, he was a member of a unit that saw action against the Rogue River Native American tribe in Oregon. After the failure of his marriage, frustrated with the slow promotion process of the Army, Kearny resigned his commission in October of that year, and embarked on a trip around the world, visiting China, Ceylon, and France. In Paris, Kearny fell in love with a New York City woman named Agnes Maxwell, but was unable to marry her because his first wife would not grant him a divorce. In 1854, Kearny injured himself when the horse he was riding fell through a rotten bridge, and the sympathetic Agnes moved in to take care of him. By 1855, Agnes and Kearny had left New York to escape the disapproving tongues of society. They settled in Kearny's new mansion, Bellegrove, overlooking the Passaic River (in what is now Kearny, New Jersey), only a short distance and across the river from his family's old manor in Newark. In 1858 his wife finally granted a divorce. Then he and Agnes moved to Paris, and were married. In 1859, Kearny returned to France, re-joining the Chasseurs d'Afrique, who were at that time fighting against Austrian forces in Italy. Later, he was with Napoleon III's Imperial Guard at the Battle of Solferino, where he was in charge of the cavalry under General Louis M. Morris, which penetrated the Austrian center, capturing the key point of the battle. For this action, he was awarded the French Légion d'honneur, becoming the first U.S. citizen to be thus honored. When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, Kearny returned to the United States and was appointed a brigadier general, commanding the First New Jersey Brigade, which he trained efficiently. The Army had been reluctant to restore his commission due to his disability, but the shocking Union defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run made them realize the importance of seasoned combat officers. His brigade, even after he left to command a division, performed spectacularly, especially at the Battle of Glendale. He received command of the 3rd Division of the III Corps on April 30, 1862. He led the division into action at the Battle of Williamsburg and the Battle of Fair Oaks. At Williamsburg, as he led his troops onto the field, Kearny shouted (in a notable quote), "I'm a one-armed Jersey son-of-a-gun, follow me!" Here again the general bravely led the charge with his sword in hand, reins in his teeth. He is also noted for urging his troops forward by declaring, "Don't worry, men, they'll all be firing at me!" His performance during the Peninsula Campaign earned him much respect from the army and his superiors. However, he held much contempt for the commander of the Army of the Potomac, Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, whose orders (especially those to fall back) he frequently ignored. After the Battle of Malvern Hill, which was a Union victory, McClellan ordered a withdrawal, and Kearny wrote: "I, Philip Kearny, an old soldier, enter my solemn protest against this order for retreat. We ought instead of retreating should follow up the enemy and take Richmond. And in full view of all responsible for such declaration, I say to you all, such an order can only be prompted by cowardice or treason." Kearny is credited with devising the first unit insignia patches used in the U.S. Army. In the summer of 1862, he issued an order that his officers should wear a patch of red cloth on the front of their caps to identify themselves as members of his unit. The enlisted men, with whom Kearny was quite popular, quickly followed suit of their own volition. Members of other units picked up on the idea, devising their own insignia, and these evolved over the years into the modern shoulder patch. (Daniel Butterfield is credited with taking Kearny's idea and standardizing it for all corps in the Army of the Potomac, designing most of the corps badges.) Kearny was promoted to major general on July 4, 1862. By the end of August 1862, General Kearny led his division at the disastrous Second Battle of Bull Run, which saw the Union Army routed and nearly destroyed by Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. The Union army retreated towards Washington and fought with the pursuing Confederates on September 1, 1862, at the Battle of Chantilly. In a violent storm complete with lightning and pouring rain, Kearny decided to investigate a gap in the Union line and dismissively responded to the warnings of a subordinate with "The Rebel bullet that can kill me has not yet been molded." Subsequently riding into Confederate troops, Kearny ignored a demand to surrender and while attempting to escape, a single bullet penetrated the base of his spine, killing him instantly. Confederate Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill, upon hearing the gunfire, ran up to the body of the illustrious soldier with a lantern and exclaimed, "You've killed Phil Kearny, he deserved a better fate than to die in the mud." His body was returned to the Union, accompanied with a note by General Lee. Ironically, there were rumors rampant at the time in Washington that Abraham Lincoln was contemplating replacing George B. McClellan with none other than "Kearny the Magnificent".
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J304 : Union Major Gen. Philip Kearny CDV $60.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Federal
Major General Philip Kearny 3/4 length standing view cdv with Anthony backmark. Clipped corners and some foxing. Nice image of the Union's most experienced officer. It is said that Kearny was to be promoted to General of the Army of the Potomac had he not met his untimely death in Chantilly Virginia.
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J305 : Union Brig. Gen. James McPherson CDV $225.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Federal
Bust view CDV of Brigadier General James Birdseye McPherson. J.C. Elrod Louisville backmark. Cammanded the Army of the Tennessee. He was killed at the Battle of Atlanta and was the highest ranking Union officer killed during the war. Nice image rouned corners, not clipped, light foxing.
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J306 : GAR Officers Badge $250.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Veterans, Grand Army of the Republic, Medals & Ribbons
Present officer's badge for Department (state). Aides-de-Camp. Red border indicates that this badge was issued to an officer of the Department of GAR. Buff borders would indicate national level officers while blue borders would be reserved for post officers. Very nice condition, no holes or rips to the ribbon.
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J332 : CDV of 9th NJ Inf. Col. Hufty Unknown $95.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Identified
A fine CDV of Col Samuel Hufty, 9th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. Full standing image with cap on rail, number nine is visible in infantry horn. Backmark- Schreiber & son Phil PA. Rounded corners.
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J333 : rare CDV of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick Unknown $180.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, CDV's, Identified
A rare CDV of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (Kill Cavalry), New Jersey born West Point graduate, fought as Cavalry Commander at Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea, wounded in action. 3/4 seated view with hat on lap. By C.D. Frederick & Co. NY. fine condition.
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J336 : Federal Officer's Frock Coat Unknown $2,600.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Uniforms, Federal
Civil War Infantry officers single breasted frock coat, 2nd LT. shoulder straps and big I infantry buttons, the lining is stenciled G3 43 indicating most likely New York 43rd Infantry, in addition a partial name is discernible , Charles ------- 562 seventh st New York City, condition is good , the sleeve buttons are gone and a small hole remains where they were, all 9 buttons are intact, there is no visible mothing, some loose treading about the shoulder straps.
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J337 : 1/4 plate tintype of 5 Federal officers Unknown $440.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, Tintypes, Union
A scarce quarterplate tintype of five Federal officers mounted in a very good thermoplastic case made by Littlefield, Parsons and Co. Cupid and Stag Berg# 1-28. Three officiers are standing behind two that are seated. Three are wearing forage caps, others are wearing slouch hats. The image is a little blurred along the left side, not affecting the subjects. Cool image.
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J338 : 7th Corps Badge Unknown $450.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Insignia, Corps Badges
Civil War Corps Badge. 7th Corps. Has original T-bar pin. 1 1/2" h. nice patina.
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J347 : Full Plate Federal Cavalrymen Unknown $550.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, Tintypes, Union
Full plate tintype in frame. Full standing image of a Federal cavalrymen. He is wearing a shell jacket and is equiped with his belt and sword rig, with cap box and a revolver tucked in. he is hold a M1860 cavalry sabre. This image was taken in a studio in fron of a painted camp scene. A vert nice image housed in a period frame.
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J349 : 1/9th plate Confederate ambrotype Unknown $640.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, ambrotype, Confederate
1/9th plate ambrotype of a Confederate soldier bust view. This young soldier, with rosy cheeks, appears to be wearing a Richmond Depot II jacket, and a forage cap with a letter G. Image is a little dark but has great clarity. The image is in a half a case. Confederate images are becoming more dificult to find and this one is quite nice and very fairly priced.
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J393 : Quarter plate image of 3 federal soldiers, one with pioneer brigade badge $760.00
Category : Civil War
Sub Categories : Photographs, Tintypes
Quarter plate tintype of 3 unidentified Federal soldiers from the "Pioneer Brigade". Housed in an A.P. Critchlow and Co. case ""Alone at the rendezvous" Berg 1-35. Image is bright and clean, case has rounded corners but hinges are tight, General William Rosecrans issued General Order No. 3 on November 3, 1862, which stated: There will be detailed immediately, from each company of every regiment of infantry in this army, two men, who shall be organized as a pioneer or engineer corps attached to its regiment. The twenty men will be selected with great care, half laborers and half mechanics. The most intelligent and energetic lieutenant in the regiment, with the best knowledge of civil engineering, will be detailed to command, assisted by two non-commissioned officers. This officer shall be responsible for all equipage, and shall receipt accordingly. Under certain circumstances it may be necessary to mass this force: when orders are given for such a movement, they must be promptly obeyed. The wagons attached to the corps will carry all the tools, and the men's camp equipage. The men shall carry their arms, ammunition, and clothing. Division quartermasters will immediately make requisitions on chief quartermasters for the equipment, and shall issue to regimental quartermasters on proper requisition. Equipment For Twenty Men - Estimate For Regiment Six Felling Axes Six Hammers Six Hatchets Two Half-Inch Augurs Two Cross-Cut Saws Two Inch Augurs Two Cross Cut Files Two Two-Inch Augurs Two Hand-Saws Twenty lbs. Nails, Assorted Two Hand-Saw Files Forty lbs. Spikes, Assorted Six Spades One Coil Rope Two Shovels One Wagon, with four horses, or mules. Three Picks It is hoped that regimental commanders will see the obvious utility of this order, and do all in their power to render it as efficient as possible. The troops detailed in accordance with that order was to number just under three thousand men but their actual numbers varied as widely as the need for their service. The first duties assigned to the Pioneers were generally those of sappers and miners. However as their expertise grew so did the diversity of their tasks. The key difference between these men and the regular army engineers was that the Pioneers would often move in advance of the army. All the work at the front of the army would fall on their shoulders. Conversely, the army engineers were employed chiefly on the lines of communication to the rear. Both would be active in reinforcing gains made by the army on it's march. Therefore, the Pioneer's duties would consist of the two tasks that were the most critical to an army advancing onto enemy soil; the same two General Buell sorely overlooked, reinforcing captured enemy ground to protect the rear and preparing transportation infrastructure to hasten the advance. The result was that the Union army in the West now had the means to do what it failed to achieve the past summer.
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